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Frequently Asked Questions - Government

We asked Ted Rowlands, one of the longest serving MP in the House of Commons, a number of questions concerning his work. The questions were:

  1. What gives you the most satisfaction from being an MP?
  2. What is the hardest part of your job?
  3. How do you become an MP?
  4. What issues are you most interested in?
  5. How has British society changed since you became an MP?
Below you can read the answers to the questions.

 
HOUSE OF COMMONS
LONDON SW1A 0AA
FAX

 

 To:  Mr Simon Smith, Assistant Director, Teacher Training 
The British Council
Fax No:  48 (22) 6219955
 From: Ted Rowlands MP Date:  

No: of pages including cover 

Our Ref:
25 January 1999

1

35425/0199

 
Dear Mr Smith

Many thanks for your letter. I attach my replies to your questions:
 

  1. Representing and being the sole representative of a very remarkable and historic constituency which helped to give birth to the Labour party’s parliamentary representation. Being able to connect the needs and wishes of the constituency to national policies and decisions. I am a passionate believer in our particular kind of parliamentary representation and system. There is still nothing quite like the House of Commons.

  2.  
  3. After more than 30 years in the House, I find separation from my wife during the week still one of the hardest parts of the job.

  4.  
  5. There are no such fixed procedures. I was first selected as a 26 year old by accident! You have to belong to the Labour Party, to have shown commitment in one way or another, and have a lot of luck: -  be in the right place at the right time!

  6.  
  7. Mostly those relating to the deprived nature of the community I represent -benefit, social security, unemployment, local housing and most recently, the Child Support Agency.

  8.  
  9. Over 30 years there have been fundamental economic and social changes: fewer manufacturing jobs, no mining jobs, a generation of households who have not known regular work -  a dramatic change in family life - many more single parents, and births outside marriage.
Yours sincerely

Ted Rowlands MP
 

Ted Rowlands MP and Maria Karasińska-Fendler, Under Secretary of State at the Committee for Integration with Europe


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